Saturday

“The Texas-born, Louisiana-raised musical storyteller has earned worldwide fame for her ability to ignite a full-scale roadhouse rhythm and blues party every time she strolls onto the stage. Her groove-laden New Orleans boogie, deeply soulful ballads and rollicking Gulf Coast blues have made her a one-of-a-kind favorite with music fans all over the world. In 2010, she was inducted into the Gulf Coast Hall Of Fame and in 2012 into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame. She’s received a total of six Living Blues Awards and nine Blues Music Awards (and has a whopping 42 nominations). She’s received five Grammy Award nominations, including five of her six previous Alligator albums. Always a songwriter of renown, Ball delved deeper into songwriting than she ever had in her career with her Grammy-nominated 2010 Alligator release, Roadside Attractions, creating one of her best and most personal albums.

On The Tattooed Lady And The Alligator Man, Ball continues that trajectory, drawing her listeners deep into her music with instantly memorable melodies and imaginative imagery. Her songs paint vibrant musical pictures richly detailed with characters, flavors and scenes straight out of Louisiana, Texas and the Gulf Coast. From the poignant Just Keep Holding On to the fresh start of Clean My House to the surprising and timely The Squeeze Is On to the southern warmth of Human Kindness, Ball has delivered a set of songs so well written and so well performed, she’ll astound and delight her longtime fans and give newcomers plenty of reasons to join the party. Featuring her stellar, road-tested road band, with help from friends Delbert McClinton and Terrance Simien and production by Grammy-winner Tom Hambridge (Buddy Guy, Joe Louis Walker, James Cotton, Susan Tedeschi), The Tattooed Lady And The Alligator Man is happy, moving, joyful, stirring, thought-provoking, danceable and fun.”

courtesy of www.marciaball.com

 

“Joe Louis Walker, a Blues Hall of Fame inductee and four-time Blues Music Award winner celebrates a career that exceeds a half a century. His new album Everybody Wants A Piece cements his legacy as a prolific torchbearer for the blues.  Looking back on his rich history, Walker shares, “I’d like to be known for the credibility of a lifetime of being true to my music and the blues. Sometimes I feel I’ve learned more from my failures, than from my success . But that’s made me stronger and more adventurous. And helped me create my own style . I’d like to think that when someone puts on one of my records they would know from the first notes, ‘That’s Joe Louis Walker.’”

courtesy of www.joelouiswalker.com

 

“Alvin Youngblood Hart’s Muscle Theory is a live explosion of roots rock that is a test of time in the world of music. He creates a blurred line of Blues, Roots, Country and Rock music that has been enjoyed in our culture for decades. The band bends the strings and drops the groove to a level that is only achieved with experience and true love of playing with such passion. This trio brings a very eclectic music experience that you will be telling all of your music loving fans about the next day and for years to come.

Known as a “musician’s musician,” Alvin Youngblood Hart’s praises have been sung by everyone from Bob Dylan to Brit guitar gods Eric Clapton & Mick Taylor.

In the summer of 1999 found Hart teamed up with celebrated producer Jim Dickinson to begin recording START WITH THE SOUL, a record hailed as a new-breed Southern Rock classic and one that piloted Hart’s return to the “sacred garage.” START WITH THE SOUL was chosen by the New York Times as one of the top 10 releases of 2000, as well as the BBC’s Blues Record of the Year.

In the summer of 2005, fortified in the wake of much recognition and determined to defy any stereotypes attached to his artistry, Hart released the self-produced (and personal favorite) MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKER a rock guitar free-for-all, paying homage to fallen and missing rockers like Phil Lynott and Sly Stone. Hart’s songwriting, singing and electric guitar prowess are all championed on this project and showcase the versatility he continuously strives to offer his fans and profession.
In 2006, Hart collaborated with several Memphis area musicians in the Craig Brewer cult hit film “Black Snake Moan” by both serving as a guitar tutor to the film’s leading actor, Samuel L. Jackson, and recording a duet with the film’s female lead, Christina Ricci, for the film’s riveting soundtrack.”

courtesy of www.ayhmusic.com

 

“Based out of upstate New York Cru performs in a variety of formats ranging from solo acoustic to a 7 piece-backing band. Tas Cru appears at a number of festivals and major blues venues throughout the US and Canada.  His music is heard regularly on blues radio worldwide, including Sirius/XM’s BB King’s Bluesville,where he was recently featured as one of four artists selected for its Fall 2016 Concert series. As well, Cru brings his award-winning Blues Education programs and workshops to numerous schools, hospitals and community centers.

In early bands, Tas was introduced to the great Sun Records sound and the country blues that later served as a counterpoint to the rock- blues he idolized as did so many young guitar players of his time.  These combined influences are heard in his music  – 50+ original songs on six albums- “Biscuit” (2006), “gravi-Tas “(2008), “Grizzle n’ Bone” (2009),  “Jus’ Desserts” (2010), “Tired of Bluesmen Cryin'” (2012), and his 2015 album, “You Keep the Money.”

Cru grew up in a very musical and generally unquirky family (except for him).  Unlike his talented brother and sisters, he did not pursue music in school.  A brief attempt to play the trombone abruptly ended after being kicked by his 7th grade music teacher.  Cru says he deserved it.  Cru instead explored and developed his talent by taking up with a rougher crowd of older, self-taught musicians where he was introduced to the songs of the Sun Records legends.  Cru’s first foray into the blues came after leaving the US Navy when he was asked to join a band formed by a former shipmate named Delray Streeter, a bluesman of unlimited bravado and attitude but limited singing and harmonica skills.  Streeter was raised in El Dorado, Arkansas and claimed a rich blues heritage from his upbringing.  This partnership, though shot-lived, proved to be very influential as Streeter’s repertoire tended toward the older and much rawer country blues.  Cru’s schooling in country blues later served him well and is infused into his original songs along with his Sun Records and rock-blues influences. ”

courtesy of www.tascru.com

 

Representing the Suncoast Blues Society, the Souliz Band was the runner-up in the band category at the 2017 International Blues Challenge in Memphis.

“THE SOULIZ BAND CAME TO LIFE AT THE END OF 2011 WHEN TONY AND NED DECIDED TO GO BACK ON STAGE FOR THE SAKE OF BRINGING BACK THE OLD DAYS. SIMILAR INTERESTS LED THOSE TWO INTO A STRUGGLE TO FIND PEOPLE WHO COULD BLEND IN WITH THEIR UNIQUE IDEA OF PLAYING A VARIETY OF STYLES. TWEETY WAS THE FIRST ONE TO KEEP THE JOB AND FOR A GOOD REASON. HER TALENT AND WORK ETHIC. THEN ‘VELMA’, AND ‘MYRA, SHOWED UP AND THE CIRCLE WAS CLOSED. ‘VELMA’ LITERALLY TOOK OVER THE BAND AND NONE OF US SAID A WORD. WHY SHOULD WE! MYRA ADDED HEART AND SOUL TO THE MIX AND THEN CAME DARRELL LINDSEY PROVIDED A NO NON-SENSE RHYTHM. WE THINK WE HAVE THE RIGHT MIX OF IDEAS AND PERSONALITIES TO CLIMB OUR WAY UP AS SUCCESSFUL ENTERTAINERS IN THE TAMPA BAY AREA. KNOWING EACH ONE OF US, OUR SKILLS AND PERSONALITIES, WE WILL NOT STOP UNTIL WE GET TO THE TOP. WE ARE ALL ABOUT THE MUSIC.”

courtesy of www.thesoulizband.com

 

“A Montgomery, Ala., native, Green was born in the 1930s and began his musical journey with nothing but his own imagination. He plays a “mouth harp,” as Rick Ambrose calls it — that is, he makes the sounds of a harmonica with his vocal chords. This was a technique a lot of the old bluesmen used because they couldn’t afford to buy a harmonica, according to Ambrose. Green said he had never seen anyone else do it when he started trying it.

“At first, people laughed at me, but I kept trying,” he said. Then, when he started to master the technique, he said, “people’s eyes got big.”

The teenager also taught himself to play guitar, first playing rock ‘n’ roll, later moving into the blues. His influences were B.B. King, Muddy Waters, Jimmy Reed and John Lee Hooker. Green also started to make up his own songs.

“Blues is a thing that you live,” he said, and he was living them.Throughout his adult life, Green worked a series of manual labor jobs, from lawn maintenance to laying pipe. He was living in Ocala and spending much of his extra money on alcohol. He played his music, but thought he wasn’t good enough to perform in clubs. When he and his wife split up, Green said, “I was down and out. I came to the blues.”

As low as he was in those days, Green now says he’s almost glad it happened. His music became the main focus in his life. More bad news — he lost his job laying pipe when the company that employed him folded — pushed him into being a full-time musician.”That’s when I started practicing every day and the more I practiced, the better I got.”The practice paid off when he was spotted at The Yearling one night by Rick Ambrose.”I was blown away by his old-style blues,” said Ambrose. “You never hear that anymore, even the old timers don’t play it much anymore.”

By old-style, Ambrose means the bare bones, stripped down “pure” blues that sounds as though it comes unfiltered and unrefined straight from the singer’s troubled soul into your ears.”

courtesy of Peter Willott, The St. Augustine Record